Working with SQL Server in Hybrid Cloud Scenarios

A hybrid cloud is a fairly attractive model when implementing cloud computing in enterprise information systems since this approach combines the advantages of public and private clouds. On the one hand, it is possible to flexibly attract external resources when needed and reduce infrastructure costs. On the other hand, full control over data and applications that the enterprise does not want to outsource remains. However, in such a scenario, we inevitably face the task of integrating data from various sources. Suppose there is a table with customers, which is vertically divided into two parts. The depersonalized part was allocated in a public cloud, and the information personalizing the customers remained in a local database. For holistic processing inside the application, you need to combine both parts by CustomerID. There are various ways to do this. Conventionally, they can be divided into two large categories: data aggregation at the on-premise database server level which, in this case, will be a single sign on for accessing local and remote data, and data aggregation within the business logic. This article will consider the first approach.

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Pitfalls of Linked Server Usage

An interesting project related to the task queue processing come to the company I work for. It was previously developed by another team. We needed to detect and resolve issues that occurred at high load on the queue.

In short, the project consisted of several databases and applications located on different servers. A ‘Task’ in the given project is a stored procedure or a .NET application. Correspondingly, the ‘task’ must be performed on a certain database and on a certain server.

All queue-related data is stored on the dedicated server. As for the servers at which tasks must be performed, they store only metadata. That is, procedures, functions, and service data related to this server. All task-related data comes from a Linked Server. (more…)