Jump to Start Test-Driven Database Development (TDDD) – Part 1

The most common approach to developing database solutions is to start creating database objects based on business requirements which is also known as “Conventional Database Development”.

In this article, we are going to explore the implementation of such approaches as conventional database development and test-driven database development on the particular examples.

To begin with, have a closer look at the conventional database development.

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Getting Started with Mssql-cli Command-Line Query Tool

A recent announcement on the release of several SQL Server tools has raised expectations across various groups. Product requirements and business are almost always a trade-off, and striking the right balance in a product in terms of the toolset is a sign of a successful product. After testing the SQL Operations Studio, I feel that it’s a promising tool for many developers, administrators, and DevOps specialists. In my opinion, the mssql-cli tool adds another feature to SQL Server in order to make it a leading database product.

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Art of Isolating Dependencies and Data in Database Unit Testing

All the database developers more or less write database unit tests that not only help in detecting bugs early but also save a lot of time and efforts when the unexpected behavior of database objects becomes a production issue.

Nowadays, there are a number of database unit testing frameworks such as tSQLt along with third-party unit testing tools including dbForge Unit Test.

On the one hand, the benefit of using third-party testing tools is that the development team can instantly create and run unit tests with added features. Also, using a testing framework directly gives you more control over the unit tests. Therefore, you can add more functionality to the unit testing framework itself. However, in this case, your team must have time and a certain level of expertise to do this.

This article explores some standard practices that can help us to improve the way we write database unit tests.

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How to Use Default and Custom Widgets in SQL Server Operations Studio

There are already a number of articles and blog posts that reveal the benefits of the SQL Operations Studio tool. The demand created across the software and the related tools are relatively unimaginable than ever before. The trend and growth will continue to increase in the upcoming days.

The graphical representation is in the vogue today. Visualizing data helps us to better understand this and to make decisions. It’s no wonder that data visualization continues to attract a growing number of users. The development of any toolset could provide opportunities to speed up the software development lifecycle process.

This article demonstrates the advantages of using custom SQL queries or complex T-SQL to provide a great insight into the database and explains how one can use this insight to build custom widgets. In this case, the SQL Operations Studio Widget is a customized piece of the code to personalize the SQL Server Dashboard for effective management of SQL instances.

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Microsoft SQL Operations Studio: Configuration and Querying

In my previous article, Microsoft SQL Operations Studio: Understanding and Installation, we discussed deeply the need for a new SQL Server development and administration graphical user interface tool that can replace the default SQL Server user interface tool, the SQL Server Management Studio. We discussed deeply the new features and the advantages of SQL Operations Studio over the SQL Server Management Studio tool and how to download and install it to the Windows machine.

In this article, we will see the different configuration of the SQL Operations Window and how we can perform our daily tasks with it.

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Microsoft SQL Operations Studio: Understanding and Installation

SQL Server Management Studio is considered as the default integrated graphical user interface tool that has been used for many years to configure, manage, monitor and administrate the SQL Server instances hosted on the local machines, on remote servers or in the cloud by all SQL Server administrators and developers. It provides us with editing, debugging and deploying environment for many languages including T-SQL, XML, MDX and DMX languages. Due to the fact that Microsoft SQL Server can be installed now on the Linux platform, and that the SQL Server Management Studio tool is not compatible with any operating system outside Microsoft Windows, the need for a new cross-platform graphical user interface appears.

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