Completing SQL. Part 3: Complementing SQL. The life of Visual Studio extensions. Working with IO. Using SQL in unconventional ways.

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What is this article about?

This is the third article in the series of articles on the life of IDE developers for databases.

Its structure will be similar to the first one and the second one, even so, I am not going to tell you about the parsing of text. This article will present information on some tricks working with files and various problems of creating a big desktop application on the .NET platform.

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Completing SQL. Part 2: Optimizing string processing and file opening

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What is this article about?

This is the second piece from the series of articles about the life of database IDE developers. Its structure is similar to that of the previous article. Just like in the first one, I’ll talk about the issues we faced and the solutions we arrived at – both effective and not so much. To understand this article, you don’t have to read the first part in its entirety, but the first few paragraphs would be useful to help you grasp the context.

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Best SQL Tools for Database Developers and Administrators

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For a SQL database developer, it is essential to have the necessary SQL tools in hand, which enable to reduce the development time of given functionality. The same is true for the tester. For a database administrator, it is also important to have monitoring tools.

In this article, we are going to look at some MS SQL Server development and monitoring tools, such as:

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Storing XML data in SQL Server

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When working on the release of dbForge Transaction Log, among other tasks, our team had to puzzle out how to properly store typed XML data.

To start with, it is worth mentioning that SQL Server does not store XML in the format it was entered. An XML string is parsed, split to tags, and thus is stored in a compressed format. Description elements that the server considers unnecessary are discarded.
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Basics of Working with JSON in SQL Server

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JSON – A Brief Background

JSON is an acronym for JavaScript Object Notation, that became popular a little over seventeen years ago. JSON is essentially a data format, it was popularized by Douglas Crockford, a well-known programmer with an interesting history who was also involved in the development of JavaScript. JSON has nearly replaced XML as a cross-platform data exchange format. It is reported to be lightweight and easier to manipulate compared to XML. In AWS CloudFormation, templates, which are actually JSON (or YAML) formatted documents, are used to describe AWS resources when automating deployments.

JSON is also used extensively in NoSQL databases such as the increasingly popular MongoDB. Virtually all the Social Media giants expose APIs that are based on JSON. I am sure you begin to get the idea of how widespread its applications have become. JSON was standardized in 2013 and the latest version of the standard (ECMA-404: The JSON Data Interchange Syntax) was released in 2017.

SQL Server introduced support for JSON in SQL Server 2016.

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Different Ways to Monitor SQL Server AlwaysOn Availability Groups

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In my previous articles, I have explained the step-by-step process of deploying an AlwaysOn Availability group on SQL Server 2017. In this article, I am going to explain how to monitor AlwaysOn availability groups.

First, let’s review the configuration of the availability group we had deployed previously. To do that, open SQL Server Management Studio Expand database engine from the object explorer Expand “AlwaysOn High Availability Expand “Availability Groups.” You can see the availability group named SQLAAG. Under this availability group (SQLAAG), you can see the list of availability replicas, availability databases, and availability group listeners. Read More