Your Ultimate Guide to SQL Join: CROSS JOIN – Part 3

CROSS JOIN is in the spotlight. This article finishes our small series of SQL JOIN-related publications. If you missed the previous two articles, refer to them as follows:  

SQL Server CROSS JOIN is the simplest of all joins. It implements a combination of 2 tables without a join condition. If you have 5 rows in one table and 3 rows in another, you get 15 combinations. Another definition is a Cartesian Product.

Now, why would you want to combine tables without a join condition? Hang on a bit because we are getting there. First, let’s refer to the syntax.

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Your Ultimate Guide to SQL Joins: OUTER JOIN – Part 2

Outer join is at the center stage today. And this is part 2 of your ultimate guide to SQL joins. If you missed part 1, here’s the link.

By the looks of it, outer is the opposite of inner. However, if you consider the outer join this way, you’ll be confused. To top that, you don’t have to include the word outer in your syntax explicitly. It’s optional!

But before we dive in, let’s discuss nulls concerning outer joins.

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Your Ultimate Guide to SQL Join: INNER JOIN – Part 1

Inner join, outer join, cross join? What gives?

It’s a valid question. I once saw a Visual Basic code with T-SQL codes embedded in it. The VB code retrieves table records with multiple SELECT statements, one SELECT * per table. Then, it combines multiple result sets into a record set. Absurd?

To the young developers who did it, it was not. But when they asked me to evaluate why the system was slow, that issue was the first to catch my attention. That’s right. They never heard of SQL joins. In fairness to them, they were honest and open to suggestions.

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